Project to build world’s biggest tractor in Carnamah earns council tick of approval

Phoebe PinMidwest Times
An artist impression of the giant Chamberlain 40KA tractor which would be built in Carnamah.
Camera IconAn artist impression of the giant Chamberlain 40KA tractor which would be built in Carnamah. Credit: Supplied

Carnamah is one step closer to becoming the home of the world’s biggest Chamberlain tractor after the local government threw its support behind the project last month.

Organisers first approached the Shire of Carnamah in March to request in-kind support for grant applications to fund the project, which would see the installation of a replica 40KA model Chamberlain tractor in the Mid West town.

The Shire initially rejected the request due to the proposal not meeting official requirements, but councillors last month agreed to support the project.

As the tractor will be located on Shire-leased land, the local government will cover insurance costs of $1680 annually, with $602 to be paid upfront in the first year.

In a letter to the council, Carnamah Big Tractor Committee chair Brendon Haeusler said the construction of the tractor was estimated to cost $1.3 million, with the 36 tonnes of steel required to build the piece pushing up the price.

Concrete footings for the tractor are priced at $10,000, and high-quality paint will cost $200,000.

Mr Haeusler said the committee hoped to raise $300,000 from private and corporate donations, with the rest of the cost to be covered by Federal Government grants.

“We are currently looking at a Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal grant of up to $150,000 which should be announced in September, which would get us over the $300,000 aimed for,” he said in his letter.

“I believe this project is worthy of being on the Carnamah strategic plan for the future, and the council may want to consider putting some funds towards this project.”

Mr Haeusler said the “huge project” would help put Carnamah on the map and generate employment opportunities for the community.

“We see the benefits will be massive and ongoing for the town and the entire district and help secure the vibrancy of our community for the following 100-plus years,” he said.

It will more than likely be the only chance we will ever get to have a world-first attraction like this in Carnamah.

Carnamah farmer Brendon Haeusler in a paddock of his first planting of Rosalind barley which is being grazed by a mob of Merino ewes and first cross lambs.
Camera IconCarnamah farmer Brendon Haeusler in a paddock of his first planting of Rosalind barley which is being grazed by a mob of Merino ewes and first cross lambs. Credit: Countryman

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