Floral fun still blooms despite chill

Karen HuntSouth Western Times
Merle Davis, right, has been working to publicise the Festival of Country Gardens with Judy Matts, Lee Wittenoom, Julia Boyle and Margaret Wright.
Camera IconMerle Davis, right, has been working to publicise the Festival of Country Gardens with Judy Matts, Lee Wittenoom, Julia Boyle and Margaret Wright. Credit: Karen Hunt / Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

Festival of Country Gardens organisers have been working hard in unseasonal conditions to bring spring colour to Bridgetown’s streets.

Banners, signs and floral displays have appeared around town to alert visitors and townspeople that the festival prelude begins this weekend.

Business owners are also being encouraged to decorate their shop fronts using a spring theme, organiser Merle Davis said.

“We encourage the shops to get into the mood and theme of it all, and we’ve created a little competition,” she said.

Eighteen gardens will be open around Warren Blackwood during the prelude, ahead of the main festival from November 3-8.

While unseasonal weather has created a challenge for festival organisers and gardeners, winter flowers can still be seen in some gardens along with spring blooms, according to Lee Wittenoom, whose garden is among those open on Saturday and Sunday.

“Bulbs are still in evidence; tulips, bluebells, irises,” she said.

Special events this weekend include a sundowner at the Cidery, a sausage sizzle to celebrate Hillview Nursery’s anniversary, guided walks at Greenbushes and Balingup and an art trail.

The window dressing competition will be judged today.

A garden sculpture is also being raffled to raise funds.

Go to www.festivalofcountrygardens.com for more information.

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