Imports on the go day and night

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Justin FrisSouth Western Times
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Printsync South West Slammers women’s American import Makailah Dyer is relishing her opportunity to play basketball outside of the US and is one of many imports who dream of a pro career.
Camera IconPrintsync South West Slammers women’s American import Makailah Dyer is relishing her opportunity to play basketball outside of the US and is one of many imports who dream of a pro career. Credit: Justin Fris

For thousands of talented American imports such as Makailah Dyer, the pursuit of a professional basketball career goes way beyond suiting up for the Printsync South West Slammers on game night.

Although Wisconsin born-and raised Dyer loves being able to play for an SBL team by the beach – given the usual frozen tundra and wind chill she experiences in winter – there are several other important tasks she completes day to day in a lead up for a big game.

“Depending on the day, I will have clinics at schools working with kids of different ages,” she said.

“I’ll then go home and have dinner and head to training. On days that we don’t have clinics, it’s about just getting in the gym and doing your weight training and getting your shots up.”

Though there is an element of free time during an import’s schedule, Dyer diligently watches game film of upcoming opponents and scours weekly scouting reports in a bid to get an edge for her team.

Few people realise that a basketball player needs to be at their peak typically between 6.30pm and 10.30pm – therefore a routine which accounts for this is imperative.

“Usually we go to the gym around 2 or 2.30pm when they are setting up for the D-League game,” she said.

“We go to Eaton and get some shots up and then I typically go and take a quick nap.”

Post-game, filled with lactic acid and adrenaline, players can often have a hard time getting straight to sleep after a busy night – and often lie awake until early hours of the morning.

“After games I have the toughest time sleeping because I’m so wired,” Dyer said. “Whether you are excited or you are kind of upset thinking about what you could have done differently after a loss.”

While propped up with some ice bags, Dyer typically uses this time to watch Netflix or chat with her family back in Wisconsin.

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