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Bright sparks bring future into focus at STEM fair

Emily AceSouth Western Times
Newton Moore Senior High School Year 9 students Darcy Beacham and Dustin Kendall demonstrate surface tension at their bubble exhibit.
Camera IconNewton Moore Senior High School Year 9 students Darcy Beacham and Dustin Kendall demonstrate surface tension at their bubble exhibit. Credit: Jon Gellweiler South Western Times/Bunbury Herald

Experiments, F1 cars and bubble exhibits were all on show at Newton Moore Senior High School last week as part of the annual STEM fair.

The fair was an all-day science, maths, engineering and technology extravaganza, which this year celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Head of science Lorraine Ellis said the event was a highlight on the school calendar.

“It’s a whole term’s work for the students,” she said.

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“They have their own research project and it can be either an engineering project or science investigation.

“They have to submit a written report and transfer that onto a board for a visual display to communicate to the community their science idea.”

Other displays included dry ice experiments, Aquaculture displays, Van de Graaff generator demonstrations, robot exhibits and an activity which determined the half life of popcorn.

The science specialist students also showcased their hard work on two major projects: The F1 in Schools and Subs in Schools.

The F1 in Schools competition requires a team of five students to design and 3D print racing cars fitted with a carbon dioxide cannister to race against their competitors.

Similarly, the Subs in Schools requires a team to create a remote controlled submarine which will go down and has to go through gates and follow a circuit underwater.

“They are busy building up their models to enter in the State competition later in the year,” Ms Ellis said.

“It is a very comprehensive program and it takes most of the year to do.”

Ms Ellis said local primary schools and teachers from as far as Perth attended the fair, with the aim of taking ideas back to their own schools.

“STEM is the future and it is important to get students engaged early and have the girls involved as well,” she said.

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