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Bunbury women inducted to WA Women’s Hall of Fame

Headshot of Shannon Verhagen
Shannon VerhagenSouth Western Times

With their passion for education and empowering others, Eaton’s Kate Heaslip and Bunbury’s Lyn Farrell have touched the lives of many.

And on Sunday, the two South West women were inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame for their work and had their faces broadcast on the big screen with fellow West Australian inductees at Yagan Square to celebrate.

Through her small business Book Incubator, Mrs Heaslip, pictured, who has a background in education and lectured at Edith Cowan University, runs workshops where members of the community write and illustrate their own personal books.

Eaton’s Kate Heaslip has been inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame for her business Book Incubator, which empowers people to tell their stories.
Camera IconEaton’s Kate Heaslip has been inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame for her business Book Incubator, which empowers people to tell their stories. Credit: Shannon Verhagen/Shannon Verhagen Picture: Shannon Verhagen

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Once finished, their books are “launched” to family and friends.

“The concept is you tell a story or a snippet of your story,” Mrs Heaslip said. “You don’t try and tell your memoir, but you take a story, so it could be your first job or your first love … one kid’s story was about him wanting to play more.”

From children in schools, to cancer patients, people with a disability and those who have suffered trauma, Mrs Heaslip has helped people from all walks of life to share their stories, which she said was both a therapeutic and empowering process. As for the recognition, the grandmother said she was “gobsmacked” but humbled.

I would never have dreamt it in a million years.

Kate Heaslip
Lyn Farrell and her son Malcom.
Camera IconLyn Farrell and her son Malcom.

For ECU South West dean Mrs Farrell — whose education career spans 30 years — the recognition was particularly special.

“My son actually nominated me, which is just an extra joy to a mother,” she said.

In the past three decades, Mrs Farrell has travelled across regional WA, working in the Goldfields, Pilbara and Great Southern, as well as the metro area.

She has taught human and community services, programs for indigenous people and women and for the past seven years, been at the helm of university education in the South West.

I’ve been very blessed to have a career in education, I’ve loved what I’ve done. I’m very honoured and humbled.

Lyn Farrell

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