Collie Shire Council puts indoor pool on backburner

Stuart McGuckinSouth Western Times
Collie-Preston MLA Mick Murray and Premier Mark McGowan at the Collie Pool in 2017 after $2 million was allocated to build an indoor pool as well as swimming clubrooms.
Camera IconCollie-Preston MLA Mick Murray and Premier Mark McGowan at the Collie Pool in 2017 after $2 million was allocated to build an indoor pool as well as swimming clubrooms. Credit: Kate Fielding

Plans to develop an indoor heated pool in Collie have again been rejected by the shire council.

Councillors were asked to consider an agenda item at Tuesday’s meeting after Sports and Recreation Minister Mick Murray requested a formal decision be made.

Mr Murray had written to the council to say he considered a decision made by the council earlier this year about building an indoor heated pool to be open-ended.

In 2007, Mr Murray made a $2 million election commitment for an indoor pool and clubrooms to be built in the town and last year a feasibility study and a community survey were conducted.

Collie shire chief executive officer David Blurton said as well as opting not to proceed with developing an indoor pool, councillors had voted to request the balance of the funding for the construction of a “community facility” be considered by the Minister.

He said the council favoured the construction of a community facility rather than clubrooms for the swimming club so it could operate in a different manner.

“The physical structure would probably not be too different, the key difference would be how it is managed,” he said.

“Rather than one club having exclusive access to its use it would potentially be a shared facility.

“The intent is that it would be available to other groups as well as the general public.”

Mr Blurton said the idea of having an indoor pool in town may be raised again in the future but the council had made its decision based on the affordability of the proposal at this point in time.

“Council is thinking of the ratepayers here,” he said.

“It would have meant a 2 per cent increase alone if the most affordable option had been chosen — and that had been the least popular option when we surveyed the community.

“I think there has been enough said on the topic for the time being, there has been more consultation with the community on this project than any others I can remember.”

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