Bunbury District Court: Extra jail time for dog attacker in violent Usher assault

Kate FieldingSouth Western Times
Hill was sentenced to three months behind bars for his part in the December 28, 2017, daylight attack.
Camera IconHill was sentenced to three months behind bars for his part in the December 28, 2017, daylight attack. Credit: Graphic / South Western Times

A Bunbury court has been told how a dog lost its eye while trying to protect its owner from a violent baseball bat assault.

Navarone Maxwell Hill, 31, of Usher, and his brother Waylon Mark Hill, 30, of Withers, were sentenced last week over the brutal attack in which a man walking his dog was assaulted.

Navarone Hill was sentenced in Bunbury District Court last Tuesday to three months behind bars for his part in the December 28, 2017, daylight attack.

The jail time is on top of five years and two months Hill is already serving over a drug-fuelled crash which killed a Bunbury father just days before Christmas in 2017.

Hill appeared in Bunbury Magistrates Court via video link from Bunbury Regional Prison on Friday when it was revealed he is facing another charge of driving under the influence of drugs from the day of the fatal crash along with several other unrelated charges.

Those matters were adjourned and Hill was sentenced on Friday over one count of ill treatment of an animal after pleading guilty over the attack.

Hill’s brother initiated the attack on their victim over a family dispute after driving past him on the day of the assault, but Hill followed his brother with a metal baseball bat.

The court was told, the dog’s owner heard a crack followed by a yelp as Hill hit his German shepherd with the bat.

The dog owner tried to help after he was punched and dragged along the ground, but Hill then swung the bat at him forcing him to run away.

The dog had to have an eye removed following the attack.

In court, defence lawyer Michael Joubert said Hill admitted hitting the dog once after it jumped on his brother and his sole concern was protecting his brother from the dog.

Magistrate Belinda Coleman said she accepted Hill was trying to help his brother, but the situation had arisen from an assault on the dog’s owner.

Magistrate Coleman said it was obvious the dog was trying to help its owner and it was lucky the dog did not die.

Taking into account Hill’s existing sentence, Magistrate Coleman sentenced him to a further four months jail to be served concurrently.

Hill was also ordered to pay vet costs worth $1000.

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