Gallipoli veteran dad honoured at dawn

Callum HunterSouth Western Times
Charlotte Inwood watched her mother Juliet march today in honour of her father Mervyn "Dick" Clarke, the youngest son of Bunbury's first elected mayor.
Camera IconCharlotte Inwood watched her mother Juliet march today in honour of her father Mervyn "Dick" Clarke, the youngest son of Bunbury's first elected mayor. Credit: South Western Times, Callum Hunter

Juliet Inwood’s thoughts were with her World War I veteran father when she marched for the first time at today’s Dawn Service.

Mervyn Clarke, the youngest son of Bunbury’s first elected mayor Ephraim Clarke, fought at Gallipoli and the Western Front before a head injury rendered him completely blind ahead of his return home.

“I’ve never marched before,” Mrs Inwood said.

“Somebody said ‘why don’t you come and march’ and I thought, ‘why not’.”

Mrs Inwood was watched and supported from the sides by her daughter Charlotte, who was looking forward to the moment.

“He (Mervyn Clarke) would be wondering what all this fuss was about,” she said.

The legacy of Mervyn Clarke is set to live on well after Anzac Day with custom made tools and one of his handmade cabinets on display at the King Cottage Museum while a dedicated display at the New Museum for WA will be unveiled next year.

Bunbury Historical Society member Tyril Houghton was thrilled when Mrs and Ms Inwood visited the cottage on Tuesday and said it put the society’s “Remembering Them” display into focus.

“It was amazing... having the daughter and granddaughter there was a wonderful experience,” she said.

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