Koombana Bay dolphins ‘check out’ visiting whales

Kate FieldingSouth Western Times
Two Southern Right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week.
Camera IconTwo Southern Right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week. Credit: Valeria Senigaglia / Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit

Boat passengers cruising Koombana Bay this week got a surprise when two southern right whales frolicked close to shore.

The two whales appeared in front of passengers on a Dolphin Discovery Centre Eco Cruise on Monday.

Two Southern Right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week.
Camera IconTwo Southern Right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week. Credit: Valeria Senigaglia / Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit

Researchers from the Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit based at the centre captured the moment the two whales swam close to the Inner Harbour and interacted with the bay’s permanent dolphin residents.

Research unit head Professor Lars Bejder said it was good that researchers were slowly starting to see whales further north.

Two southern right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week.
Camera IconTwo southern right whales frolicked with dolphins in Koombana Bay this week. Credit: Valeria Senigaglia / Murdoch University Cetacean Research Unit

“From time to time they do venture up north for resting and breeding to give birth to calves,” Professor Bejder said.

“They’re looking for a quiet place and if they find a good spot they could stay around for a few months.”

He said dolphins would have been curious about the visitors and were “just checking them out”.

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