Sensory play helps children

Zach RelphSouth Western Times

Like most children, Dylan Addy enjoys playing – especially when he is playing at the Carey Park Child and Parent Care Centre.

The four-year-old visits the centre each Thursday for the MyTime playgroup with his mother Liz Hay and younger brother Alex Addy, 2.

Alex Slater enjoys playing with the bubbles.
Camera IconAlex Slater enjoys playing with the bubbles. Credit: Supplied

Dylan, who has autism, is one of the children who take part in the weekly group designed to provide support to parents of children with a disability or chronic medical condition.

The program – an initiative between the Carey Park-based centre and College Row School – uses sensory play and craft activities to help improve communication skills.

Harrison McDonald having a blast in the spinning chair.
Camera IconHarrison McDonald having a blast in the spinning chair. Credit: Supplied

It caters for children aged five years and under who have disabilities, complex communications problems or an undiagnosed mental delay.

Investing In Our Youth service partnerships and family liaisoncommunity coordinator Pam Macnish said the free two-hour service was social and engaging.

Phoebe Griffiths with education assistant Stephanie Lee.
Camera IconPhoebe Griffiths with education assistant Stephanie Lee. Credit: Supplied

“The major aim for this group is to offer support to parents and introduce communicative tools for the kids while having fun,” Mrs Macnish said.

The group started this year and meets each Thursday from 9.30am to 11.30am during school terms.

Zoe Griffiths has fun at the MyTime group.
Camera IconZoe Griffiths has fun at the MyTime group. Credit: Supplied

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