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Tree planting to provide habitat

Cecilia AllenSouth Western Times
South West Catchment Council biodiversity manager Pip Marshall and Bunbury Green Army officer James Phillips are part of a community effort to plant trees at Tuart Brook Reserve in a bid to provide habitat for many animals.
Camera IconSouth West Catchment Council biodiversity manager Pip Marshall and Bunbury Green Army officer James Phillips are part of a community effort to plant trees at Tuart Brook Reserve in a bid to provide habitat for many animals. Credit: Cecilia Allen / South Western Times

The South West Catchments Council is working with community volunteers to restore native bushland at Tuart Brook Reserve.

Students from Maidens Park Primary School, Dalyellup Bushrangers Cadets, Newton Moore Education Support Centre and Newton Moore Senior School Bushranger cadets have helped plant more than 4000 native seedlings on 2ha of land.

The Green Army also helped plant 1700 seedlings on Monday and Carey Park Scout Group will plant more seedlings on Saturday.

The trees will provide habitat for animals, including threatened species such as black cockatoos and the western ringtail possum.

Biodiversity manager Pip Marshall said it was important for the SWCC to work with young people and community groups.

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“We aim to engage students in planting native seedlings to improve their wellbeing, help reconnect them with nature and encourage them to be the future stewards of the park area,” she said.

Ms Marshall said Tuart Brook Reserve was part of the proposed Preston River to Ocean Regional Park and formed an important natural bushland connection between Maidens Reserve and Manea Park.

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