Bunbury High School students dig in to help out

Kate FieldingSouth Western Times
The school’s Shed Works members, led here by Tahlia Moyle, 15, and Luke Sharpe, 16, front, have planted a whopping 4300 plants at Wally Crowd Reserve along Koombana Drive.
Camera IconThe school’s Shed Works members, led here by Tahlia Moyle, 15, and Luke Sharpe, 16, front, have planted a whopping 4300 plants at Wally Crowd Reserve along Koombana Drive. Credit: Kate Fielding / South Western Times

More than 4000 new Australian native plants will “beautify” one of the main entrances into Bunbury when a handful of the city’s students finish a labour-intensive project today.

Students from Bunbury Senior High School’s Shed Works program are set to finish stage three of landscaping work at Wally Crowd Reserve along Koombana Drive.

The students joined forces with Bunbury City Council for the project, which involved planting 4300 plants, re-mulching and digging up weeds in the area.

City of Bunbury landscape and open space manager Kristy Tillett said the project was a “massive” job for the students and provided them with skills that would work in their favour when going for employment in the future.

“They’ve worked really hard and it’s great work experience for them,” Ms Tillett said.

“Hopefully Thursday will be the final stage then we’ll be watering in after that.”

Shed Works program coordinator Paul McKenzie said the project was among a number the students had been doing and was invaluable for their future.

“This kind of work in particular proves to them they can sustain effort and they can succeed,” Mr McKenzie said.

“It goes down on their resume as a community service, which is something employers favour and it gives the students an edge.

“The council has been very supportive and keeps us on the radar.”

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