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Challenge to pique students’ interests

Emily AceSouth Western Times
Rotary Club of Bunbury Leschenault president Steve Woodhouse with Year 10 engineering student Cora Pickett who is set to compete and mentor primary school students at the Science and Engineering Challenge.
Camera IconRotary Club of Bunbury Leschenault president Steve Woodhouse with Year 10 engineering student Cora Pickett who is set to compete and mentor primary school students at the Science and Engineering Challenge. Credit: South Western Times, Jon Gellweiler

Bright sparks from across the region will show off their skills at the South West Sports Centre this week as they participate in the Science and Engineering Challenge.

The challenge, presented by the Rotary Club of Bunbury Leschenault, allows students to experience aspects of science and engineering which they would not usually see in their school environment.

The competition will begin today, with Year 9 and 10 students diving into eight different activities to span two days.

The third day will hand over the baton to Year 5 and 6 students, who will be mentored by the Newton Moore Senior High School team, to entice their interest in STEM.

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Activities will include the construction of bridges, creating an electrical circuit to distributing power around a city grid and for the first time, a water turbine activity.

Rotary Club of Bunbury Leschenault president Steve Woodhouse talks with Year 10 engineering students Isabella Green, Alex Hendry, Aiden Doak and Cora Pickett, ahead of the Science and Engineering Challenge.
Camera IconRotary Club of Bunbury Leschenault president Steve Woodhouse talks with Year 10 engineering students Isabella Green, Alex Hendry, Aiden Doak and Cora Pickett, ahead of the Science and Engineering Challenge. Credit: South Western Times, Jon Gellweiler

Club president Steve Woodhouse said the challenge would equip students with practical skills and pique their interest in pursing STEM subjects.

“It’s not pass or fail, it is really about getting that experience,” Mr Woodhouse said.

“The take-up of science and maths subjects has been diminishing over the last 30 years in the face of an increasingly technological world.

“We need to turn that curve upwards otherwise we are not going to be competitive in the future.”

The winning school will be declared State champions and will be invited to compete at nationals.

Mr Woodhouse said local industry support made the event possible.

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