Climate protest

Nicole SalmeriSouth Western Times
Bunbury Cathedral Grammar School students Chelsea Roddy, 12, and Katie Fenech, 14, at the global climate strike in Anzac Park.
Camera IconBunbury Cathedral Grammar School students Chelsea Roddy, 12, and Katie Fenech, 14, at the global climate strike in Anzac Park. Credit: Nicole Salmeri

More than 300 children and community members rallied along Victoria Street as part of the global climate strike on Friday.

Bunbury organiser of the global climate strike Lachlan Kelly said he had always been a strong activist for the global climate change movement.

“I’m passionate about it because it’s such a dire situation,” Lachlan said.

“We have spent the last 30 years just carrying on as if nothing is happening and it has gotten to this point where we are having extreme weather events such as in Queensland — the rainforests are pretty much burnt to a cinder right now.

“I think it is important because it is going to affect us largely and we will have the burden put on us with fighting extreme bushfires and by coming out today we are basically saying, no we don’t want that.”

Global climate strike Bunbury organisers Bella Bergemeister and Lachlan Kelly lead the more than 300 fellow protestors down Victoria Street on Friday.
Camera IconGlobal climate strike Bunbury organisers Bella Bergemeister and Lachlan Kelly lead the more than 300 fellow protestors down Victoria Street on Friday. Credit: Nicole Salmeri

Forrest MHR Nola Marino said she was on target to meet the agreements within the United Nations framework convention on climate change.

“I have never been opposed to people expressing their views and concerns, no matter what age they are,” she said.

“I accept that climate change is an important issue, as does the Government and we have a strong climate change policy based around the investment of billions of dollars in low emission technology through the Clean Energy Finance Corporation.

“We met our Kyoto Agreement targets and we are on track to meet our Paris Agreement commitments.”

Mrs Marino said she had always considered climate change as an issue and believed everyone could make a positive contribution by minimising energy use and personal consumption.

More than 300,000 people attended more than 100 rallies across the nation.

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